7 Home Decor Solutions via HGTV


We’ve compiled a curated list from a recent HGTV post on home decor do’s and dont’s. What we came up with are 7 home decor solutions, mixed in with a few of our products, we think you’ll find helpful.

1. Gallery Wall

Display your favorite photos in a gallery wall and switch them out whenever you’d like. You can organize the rest of your photos in albums by decade or event, and keep them nicely arranged on a bookshelf.






2. Stylish Accent Pieces

Use accents to incorporate the look you enjoy without being overwhelming. If you have a house in the mountains and love the beach, display a collection of seashells or coral in or on a bookcase or end table instead of designing an entire beach-style room.





3. Updated Hardware

Make small changes like switching the hardware on your kitchen or bath cabinets for a big impact.







4. Balance Furniture Pieces

Use something light made of glass or with legs, and add a tall, thin floor lamp to help bring your eye up and make it more dynamic. Be sure to keep your furniture arrangements balanced to the eye.




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5. Inviting Yet Elegant

If you have the space, use it. Give your room a function, make it livable and ensure it’s welcoming.







6. Hidden Storage

Invest in stylish storage baskets on a bookcase or shelf to keep small objects in their proper spot, or add an armoire for extra hidden storage.







7. Buy Right-Sized Furniture

Follow these tips to avoid buying furniture that doesn’t fit:
1. Draw a to scale floor plan or purchase a room design kit so you can find the best layout without moving heavy furniture.
2. Embrace “less is more”, and don’t try to put too much into any space.
3. Measure the room before buying furniture pieces, and you’ll decrease the chances of making a mistake.




Fourth of July: 10 Fun Facts

Fourth of July Fun Facts

American Bald… Turkey?
In a letter to his daughter in 1784, Benjamin Franklin wrote that he was displeased that the bald eagle had been chosen as the symbol for the nation. “He is a Bird of bad moral character. He does not get his Living honestly,” he wrote. “You may have seen him perched on some dead Tree near the River, where, too lazy to fish for himself, he watches the Labour of the Fishing Hawk.”

A turkey is a far “more respectable” bird, he argued. “Turk’y… [is a] true original Native of America,” Franklin wrote. “He is besides, though a little vain & silly, a Bird of Courage, and would not hesitate to attack a Grenadier of the British Guards who should presume to invade his Farm Yard with a red Coat on.”

Happy 2nd of July?!
Author Kenneth C. Davis has revealed that the 2nd of July may actually be the more appropriate date to mark the nation’s special day. We actually wrote a blog about it last year here: [Today is Independence Day! Really… It is.]

“The fact is that John Adams wrote home to Abigail on the 3rd that this day, July 2nd will go down in history,” Davis said during an appearance on “CBS This Morning.” “We’ll celebrate it with parades and pomp and bells ringing and fireworks, and it was because Congress actually ruled it in favor of independence on July 2. But it was two days later, of course, that Congress then accepted Jefferson’s declaration, explaining the vote two days before that really got fixed in the America’s imagination as our birthday. July 2nd should be Independence Day.”

4th of July ironically is Death Date for two Founding Fathers…
In a bizarre, though perhaps apt, twist of fate, both John Adams (left) and Thomas Jefferson (right) died on July 4, 1826.

“The publication of the Declaration of Independence may have accidentally made the Fourth of July the official day of independence for America, but the deaths of two of its founders cemented its creation of the date’s designation,” wrote the FW’s Danny Gallagher in a post commemorating Independence Day last year.

Happy Filipino & Rwandan Independence Day (too)!
July 4 marks a day of liberation in both the Philippines and Rwanda. In the Southeast Asian nation, July 4, known as “Republic Day,” marks the date when the United States officially recognized the Philippines as an independent state in 1946. (However, though the day is still significant to Filipino history, June 12 has been the country’s official Independence Day since 1962.)

Rwandans, on the other hand, celebrate “Liberation Day” on July 4. According to a 2008 post for the New York Times by blogger Josh Ruxin, the date marks the 1994 “end of the Rwandan Genocide, and the birth of the new government that rose from the ashes.”

Holiday, Shmoliday
“Americans began observing the Fourth of July as early as 1777, when the first-ever major celebration in Philadelphia included a parade, a thirteen-shot cannon salute and fireworks, but Congress didn’t make it official until 1870, when it was part of a bill passed to recognize major state holidays at a federal level — like Independence Day, Christmas and New Year’s Day,” according to TIME magazine.

Birthday Celebrations Abound!
Calvin Coolidge, the country’s 30th president, was born on Independence Day. Others celebrating birthdays on July Fourth include, Nobel laureate and economist Gerard Debreu, Olympic gold medalist and tennis Hall of Famer Pam Shriver, “Ugly Betty” actress Becki Newton and current first daughter Malia Obama (pictured here with mom, Michelle, in January.)

Hot Dogs Galore
July Fourth is the “biggest hot dog holiday of the year,” according to TIME magazine, with Americans reportedly consuming about 155 million of them on Independence Day alone.

But despite a nationwide love for the salty snack, no one really knows where the hot dog came from. According to the National Hot Dog and Sausage Council, it is “likely that the North American hot dog comes from a widespread common European sausage brought here by butchers of several nationalities.” The meaty treat’s origin story remains murky, however.

Turtle Soup, Anyone?
Though hot dogs, french fries and barbecued treats are typical Fourth of July fare nowadays, our Founding Fathers feasted on some pretty different foods to celebrate the country’s independence back in the day.

“According to legend, on July 4, 1776, John Adams…and his wife, Abigail, sat down for a celebratory meal of turtle soup, New England poached salmon with egg sauce, green peas and boiled new potatoes in jackets. They followed the meal with Indian pudding or Apple Pandowdy,” wrote Justine Sterling for Delish.com in 2011.

The “State Of Independence”
Is Pennsylvania the country’s most patriotic state?

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the so-called “State of Independence,” where the Declaration of Independence was debated and signed, is home to 11 places with the word “liberty” in their name and 33 with the word “union” in them, leading the country for the number of places with such names.

(Only one place in the nation has “patriot” in its name, according to the bureau. Patriot, Ind., is said to have an estimated population of 209.)

Tap, Tap, Tap
Due to concerns about cracking the iconic instrument, the Liberty Bell has not been rung since 1846. Instead, every year, to mark the Fourth of July, the 2,000-pound bell is tapped 13 times to signal for bells across the country to start ringing.

Did you know about any of these? What do you find most interesting about them?

Source: The Huffington Post

10 Facts About Flag Day

Flag Day

Flag Day is today, June 14th, 2015. Here are 10 interesting facts about Flag Day:

  1. Bernard J. Cigrand is considered the father of Flag Day. In 1885, as a young teacher at a high school in Waubeka, Wisconsin, Cigrand put a small flag on his desk and told his students to write essays about it. He fought for the rest of his life to formally establish the holiday, according to the National Flag Day Foundation.
  2. The flag has been changed 27 times. The final star, for Hawaii, was added in 1960.
  3. The first time the flag was flown after being adopted was on Aug. 3, 1777 in Rome, New York.
  4. The flag’s colors have become significant over time. The white is for purity, the red is for valor and the blue is for justice, according to usflag.org.
  5. President George Washington described the design like this: “We take the stars from heaven, the red from our mother country, separating it by white stripes, thus showing that we have separated from her, and the white stripes shall go down to posterity representing liberty.”
  6. The first flag was probably created by Francis Hopkinson, who signed the Declaration of Independence. He requested “a quarter cask of the public wine” as payment for his design. He was rejected.
  7. Betsy Ross sewed the first American flag according to a pattern, which was likely Hopkinson’s. Legend has it she changed the six-point stars he’d drawn to five-point ones because they were easier to stitch.
  8. Sea captain William Driver gave the flag its “Old Glory” nickname in 1831, according to usacitylink.com.
  9. The current design of the U.S. flag was created by Robert G. Heft, who made the pattern for a high school project. He earned a B- at first, but when the government chose it, his teacher raised the grade to an A.
  10. There are six American flags on the moon. Five are standing, but Neil Armstrong’s fell over.

Happy Flag Day! Which of these facts do you find most interesting or noteworthy?