10 Facts About Flag Day

Flag Day

Flag Day is today, June 14th, 2015. Here are 10 interesting facts about Flag Day:

  1. Bernard J. Cigrand is considered the father of Flag Day. In 1885, as a young teacher at a high school in Waubeka, Wisconsin, Cigrand put a small flag on his desk and told his students to write essays about it. He fought for the rest of his life to formally establish the holiday, according to the National Flag Day Foundation.
  2. The flag has been changed 27 times. The final star, for Hawaii, was added in 1960.
  3. The first time the flag was flown after being adopted was on Aug. 3, 1777 in Rome, New York.
  4. The flag’s colors have become significant over time. The white is for purity, the red is for valor and the blue is for justice, according to usflag.org.
  5. President George Washington described the design like this: “We take the stars from heaven, the red from our mother country, separating it by white stripes, thus showing that we have separated from her, and the white stripes shall go down to posterity representing liberty.”
  6. The first flag was probably created by Francis Hopkinson, who signed the Declaration of Independence. He requested “a quarter cask of the public wine” as payment for his design. He was rejected.
  7. Betsy Ross sewed the first American flag according to a pattern, which was likely Hopkinson’s. Legend has it she changed the six-point stars he’d drawn to five-point ones because they were easier to stitch.
  8. Sea captain William Driver gave the flag its “Old Glory” nickname in 1831, according to usacitylink.com.
  9. The current design of the U.S. flag was created by Robert G. Heft, who made the pattern for a high school project. He earned a B- at first, but when the government chose it, his teacher raised the grade to an A.
  10. There are six American flags on the moon. Five are standing, but Neil Armstrong’s fell over.

Happy Flag Day! Which of these facts do you find most interesting or noteworthy?

A Photo Shoot to Remember… New Products Coming Soon!

Photo Shoot Day

Yesterday we had a photo shoot that excited us so much we’ve decided to ‘sneak-peak’ a few photos of the shoot… check them out!


We started the day with new additions to our Tray Table collection… A drop-leaf party cart set of 4, a folding buffet table, and bed tray work desks…



Here is a little preview of a new furniture line we hope to continue to develop in what will be the “Metal and Wood” collection…


A ‘live edge’ coffee table previewing what will be a new collection that epitomizes American made fine craftsmanship! Check out that Cherry joinery and legs! Not to mention the Maple slab top milled and crafted to perfection!

Do you like these new products? Let us know if you want to be notified when they’re online for sale by emailing newsletter@manchesterwood.com.

Memorial Day: 7 Things You Didn’t Know

Memorial Day

While you’re busy making your Memorial Day Weekend plans, remember it’s not only about sunshine and cookouts. In it’s day of remembrance next week (Monday, May 25th), Memorial Day has some little-known facts presented here by TIME about the summer’s kick-off holiday:

1. It was originally called Decoration Day

To honor the deceased, soldiers would decorate graves of their fallen comrades with flowers, flags and wreaths. Hence Decoration Day. Although Memorial Day became its official title in the 1880s, the holiday wouldn’t legally become Memorial Day until 1967.

2. It wasn’t always celebrated the last Monday of May

After the Civil War, General John A. Logan, commander in chief of the Grand Army of the Republic, called for a holiday commemorating fallen soldiers to be observed every May 30. But due to the Uniform Monday Holiday Act, which took effect in 1971, Memorial Day was moved to the last Monday of May to ensure long weekends. Some groups, like the veterans’ organization American Legion, have been working to restore the original date to set the day apart and pay proper tribute to the servicemen and women who sacrificed their lives defending the nation.

3. It’s legally required to observe a National Moment of Remembrance

In December 2000, Congress passed a law requiring Americans to pause at 3 p.m. local time on Memorial Day to remember and honor the fallen. But this doesn’t appear to be common knowledge, or if it is, by 3 p.m. most people seem to be too deep into a hot dog-induced food coma to officially observe the moment.

4. James A. Garfield delivered a rather lengthy speech at the first Memorial Day ceremony

Of course then it was still called Decoration Day, and at the time, Garfield was a Civil War General and Republican Congressman, not yet a President. On May 30, 1868, he addressed the several thousand people gathered at Arlington National Cemetery. “If silence is ever golden,” Garfield said, “it must be beside the graves of 15,000 men, whose lives were more significant than speech, and whose death was a poem the music of which can never be sung.”

5. Several states observe Confederate Memorial Day

In addition to the national holiday, nine states officially set aside a day to honor those who died fighting for the Confederacy in the Civil War: Texas, South Carolina, North Carolina, Alabama, Virginia, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee and Georgia. The days vary, but only Virginia observes Confederate Memorial Day on the last Monday of May, in accordance with the federal observance of Memorial Day.

6. Waterloo, New York is considered the birthplace of Memorial Day

According to the town’s website, in 1966 Congress unanimously passed a resolution to officially recognize Waterloo as the birthplace of the holiday. However, it remains a contentious debate, with other towns, like Boalsburg, Pa., claiming the title of “Birthplace of Memorial Day” as well.

7. More than 36 million people will travel at least 50 miles from home this Memorial Day

At least, according to AAA estimates. That’s the highest total since the recession

Source: Time